Scrible.com: The Best Research and Writing Digital Tool I’ve Seen

I want to share this recent interview that my friend and colleague, Erica Warren, did with the CEO of www.scrible.com, a research and writing digital tool.

This is, by far, the most robust research and writing digital tool for researching and organizing your content for virtually any kind of writing project.  It is of particular interest to me because so many of our kids who learn differently really struggle with executive function and overall organization.  

But the way the Scrible.com team built the tool is ingenious.  Not only can individual students use the tool for research and wrting but teachers can use it with an entire class…AND monitor the individual progress of each student in real time throughout the research and writing process.

I won’t go on and on here regarding all of the features and functionality.  I think it makes more sense to link you to Erica’s interview with Victor Karkar.  The review is extensive (45 mins) and well worth the listen.

Click HERE for the link.

Finally, the tool is very affordable.  There are two free levels usage (if you sign up they give you a free upgrade) and the third level is called EDU PRO.  It’s only $10 per year for a middle or high school student and $28 per year for college and graduate school.

Hope you enjoy.

For the kids,

Michael

Who Can Diagnose LD and/or AD/HD Anyway?

The question of who is actually eligible to diagnose learning issues or AD/HD can be quite confusing.  There are many different degrees and titles in the world of diagnosing and treating learning problems and attention deficits.   In this post, we’re going to provide you with some practical answers.

I’m trying a little something different here.  As you scroll down this page, you’ll see that I’ve embedded an audio file AND  pasted in an article I found on LD Online.com that does a good job outlining the various professional roles that you’ve probably run across.

In the audio file, I’m providing my own commentary with practical  information about each professional role as documented in the article.  That way you can access the article anytime and choose to listen in as we review it together.

Click here to access the audio file.  (The audio file will open in a new window so you can listen and read the post at the same time.)

 

 

Can they diagnose LD and/or ADHD?

Clinical Psychologist

Provides assessment of intellectual and emotional functioning. Provides therapy for emotional and behavioral problems for individuals and groups. In general, does not do educational testing needed to diagnose LD.

Ph.D. and licensure required in most states for private practice.

Can they diagnose LD?  Yes, either by doing complete psycho/educational assessment or by including educational assessment of educational specialist.
Can they diagnose ADHD? Yes.

Cannot prescribe medication for ADHD.

 

School Psychologist

Provides assessment of learning and school related problems. Provides therapy that relates to emotional and behavioral problems evolving from school distress. Trained primarily to do both intellectual and educational testing. Can also assess emotional functioning. Usually practice in public school systems. Increasingly in private practice as well.

Ph.D. or MA Licensure in most states if in private practice.
School certification within school systems.

Can they diagnose LD?  Yes.
Can they diagnose ADHD?  No, in general, in schools.   Yes with training if private practice.

Cannot prescribe medication for ADHD.

 

Educational Psychologist

Provides educational testing. Some trained to provide assessment of cognitive, intellectual functioning as well. Important question since test companies define a Level C test which is to be administered by a PhD-trained psychologist or a professional whose training has been approved by the company who produces the test. Many tests of intellectual functioning are Level C tests. Not, in general, trained to assess emotional functioning.

Ph.D. or M.A.  and licensure required if in private practice.

Can they diagnose LD?  Yes if qualified to do assessment of intellectual functioning or if uses results of assessment done by PhD level psychologist or trained school psychologist.

Can they diagnose ADHD?  Can offer guidance but depends of level of training.

Cannot prescribe medication for ADHD.

 

Neuro-psychologist

Ph.D. level psychologist who assesses brain processing and functioning. May not be skilled in administering educational tests. In general does not assess emotional functioning.

Licensure required if in private practice in most states.

Can they diagnose LD?  Yes but may need to obtain educational from educational specialist.
Can they diagnose ADHD?   Yes.

Cannot prescribe medication for ADHD.

 

Psychometrician

Assessment specialist. Often found in school systems, forensic settings, or mental health centers.

Most states do not license for private practice.

Can they diagnose LD?  Yes.
Can they diagnose ADHD?   In general no unless they have received special training.

 

Educational Specialist

Assessment of learning and behavioral problems.

Not licensed.

Can they diagnose LD?  No.
Can they diagnose ADHD?  No

 

School Counselor

Counseling and help with school problems.

Not licensed for private practice.

Can they diagnose LD?  No.
Can they diagnose ADHD?  No.

 

Vocational Counselor

Employment counseling, assessment for employment.

Not licensed for private practice

Can they diagnose LD?  No.
Can they diagnose ADHD?  No.

 

Social Worker

Therapy and counseling for emotional and behavioral problem. Help in finding resources.

Licensed in most states for private practice.

Can they diagnose LD?  No.
Can they diagnose ADHD?  No

 

Speech and Language Specialist

Specialist diagnosing speech and language problems. These can be a component of a learning disability. Part of a diagnostic team.

Ph.D. or M.A. Private practice and schools. Licensure and certification required in most if not all states.

Can they diagnose LD?  No.
Can they diagnose ADHD?  No.

 

Occupational Therapist

Specialist working with motor and visual-motor problems. These can be a component of a learning disability. Part of a diagnostic team.

MA. Private practice and in schools. Licensure and certification required in most if not all states.

Can they diagnose LD?  No.
Can they diagnose ADHD?  No.

 

Psychiatrist or Child Psychiatrist

Medical doctor who specializes in the functioning of the mind. Does therapy for emotional and behavioral problems.

State medical board certification required.

Can they diagnose LD?  No.
Can they diagnose ADHD?  Yes.

Can prescribe medication for any condition.

 

Physician/Pediatrician

State medical board certification required.

Can they diagnose LD?  No.
Can they diagnose ADHD?  Yes.

Can prescribe medication for any condition.

Thank you to LDOnline.com and the author Kathleen Ross Kidder for providing this information.

ADD and ADHD: Taking care of your heart and soul

 

 

Click below to see the most important quote for ADD and ADHD…Take care of your heart and soul.

Hallowell Image

 

 

 

First Udemy Course Launched: Eliminate Needless Suffering–Attention Deficit Disorder Reframed

Check out my Udemy course entitled Eliminate Needless Suffering: Attention Deficit Disorder Reframed. Click here.

I’ve just launched my first course on the Udemy platform. So much needless suffering occurs when we get over-organized around the disease-based medical model and the negative implications and forget the fullness of who we are including all of our strengths.

In the course, I review the last 200 years of diagnostic labels that are precursors to the ADD and ADHD label and then provide specific ways in which you can take better charge of your life. And make happier and healthier choices.

The course is only $49 for over 110 minutes of content in 14 lectures.   Be sure to check it out and share with your network.

Adult ADHD: Churchill’s Hilarious Description of Learning to Read

We’ve all read a million times that Churchill had either ADHD or dyslexia or both. Whether he actually met the diagnostic criteria is neither here nor there.

We do know, however, that he was essentially a holy terror when he was younger. He didn’t get along with either his classmates or his teachers. He couldn’t sit still, he was headstrong and he was very stubborn. Who knows what that means when we try to schmoosh him into our current psychiatric boxes. We also know that, in spite of a rather high octane energy level, he was captivated by writing and the telling of stories.

While researching him for a webinar I’m going to do on The Upside of Attention Deficit Disorder, I found an excerpt from Churchill’s memoirs that is just hilarious. He’s describing his initial experience with learning how to read.

Hope you enjoy.

“When does one first begin to remember? When do the waving lights and shadows of dawning consciousness cast their print upon the mind of the child? My earliest memories are Ireland.

It was at ‘The Little Lodge’ I was first menaced with Education. The approach of a sinister figure described as ‘the Governess’ was announced. Her arrival was fixed for a certain day. In order to prepare for this day Mrs. Everest produced a book called Reading Without Tears. It certainly did not justify its title in my case. I was made aware that before the Governess arrived I must be able to read without tears. We toiled each day. My nurse pointed with a pen at the different letters. I thought it all very tiresome. Our preparations were by no means completed when the fateful hour struck and Governess was due to arrive. I did what many oppressed peoples have done in similar circumstances: I took to the woods.”

Now that’s funny! I wish we could all frame our frustrations so eloquently.

Disability needs to be reframed

Disability isn’t a checklist, or a fixed point. Disability – and normalcy – are socially constructed. Disability is the interaction between a characteristic or a group of characteristics often called “impairments”, and a world that recognises people with these characteristics as abnormal.

Disability is considered a tragedy, a fate to be avoided at all costs. Disabled people are those that society defines as “abnormal”. Disabled bodies are the ones that don’t fit in typical boxes. Disabled people are people that the physical and social environment doesn’t accommodate. Disabled people are considered defective, deformed, faulty, frightening, feeble, freakish, dangerous, fascinating. Disabled people are stigmatised, laughed at, looked down upon, marginalised, Othered. Disabled people are medicalised. Disabled people are defined in terms of how currently-nondisabled people view them.